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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:16 pm 
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Seeking everyones thoughts... it appears the trend is moving towards domination by the private schools in girls volleyball. Why do you think this is?

This year three of the five (60%) championship title games were won by private schools.

Last year (2010) 4 of 7 or 57% were won by private schools.
2009, 4 of 7 - 57%
2008, 3 of 7 - 43%
2007, 3 of 7 - 43%
2006, 2 of 7 - 29%
2005, 2 of 7 - 29%
2004, 1 of 5 - 14%

By my count there are currently 58 private schools that are members of the AIA of the 272 total members or 21%. Based upon these membership numbers it would follow that private schools could be expected to win 20%-30% each year, yet that is not the case. WHY?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:55 am 
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perhaps those who attend private schools have parents who can afford summer camps and club teams?

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:10 pm 
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Yes Spanky, I believe that is part of it. But, I think there is more to it than camps and clubs.
Take Seton Catholic this year, the roster in the AIA program at the state tourney listed 6-7 girls over 6' tall. The tallest being 6'4" and headed to UCLA next year. Another headed to another D1 school next year as well.
With a total enrollment of less than 600, it appear statistically impossible that all this height and talent arrive at Seton Catholic naturally.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 9:13 am 
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Perhaps their parents didn't like the atmosphere and/or education provided by the public school systems (can't blame them there with the amount of gangs, violence and drugs within our public schools) and in the process, also looked for a private school that was strong in their respective sport that could provide their child the best opportunity at an athletic scholarship. Sounds like that may be the case, and if they have the means to provide their child a better opportunity to succeed, more power to them. Quite frankly, I believe that most parents would do the same if they were able to do so; I know I would.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 4:23 pm 
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Again, I agree with your line of thinking Spanky... what are your thoughts on the fact that these private schools offer financial aid including grants and scholorships to students to offset or even pay entirely for the high tuition. In Seton's case, tuition is $11,000.00 plus per year.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 5:08 pm 
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I have no issue with it. Salpointe Catholic does the same thing, and I assume all private schools provide financial aide to those who meet the requirements; I have relatives who attended Salpointe Catholic and I even considered doing so myself, but didn't want to change schools after growing up with my friends.

My understanding is that a child needs to meet/maintain specific scholastic criteria in order to qualify for financial aide each semester and/or school year. To the best of my knowledge, this criteria is the same for non-student atheletes as well as athletes (I'm sure they make exceptions though because it's not a perfect world), so if a child is talented/dedicated enough to maintain the scholastic requirements while at the same time, juggle their extra-curricular rigors, then in my opinion they're deserving.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:33 am 
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A few years ago the AIA was pursuing the idea of placing an enrollment multiplier on private schools as has been done in several other states. The thought was that since these schools do not have boundary limits as do public schools, they have the ability to offer financial aid and scholarships and the higher probability that recruiting was occurring, a multiplier would work to level the playing field.
The way a multiplier works for the purposes of determining divisions for competition is to count each enrolled student as more than one student. For example several states use the multiplier of 1.35, others are as high as 1.8, meaning that a school with an enrollment of 500 would be counted as 675 or 900 respectively and this would place them into a higher division where the competition is better. This was supported by a majority of the member schools and hotly protested by the private schools.

A certain Arizona State legislator that also happened to be a 24 year member of the board of directors for a valley private school learned of the AIA's course and quickly introduced a bill in the House of Representatives (HB2772) that would prevent any school from membership with an organization that counts any student as more than one student. Thereby blocking any attempt by the AIA to introduce a multiplier.
That was in 2006 and today the need for action by the AIA is much greater as illustrated in my initial post. It appears to me, and is certainly my own opinion that the actions by the legislature only empowered the private schools.

I am a beliver in that tougher competition only makes you better but I dont agree with having to take a "knife to a gun fight." In the case of Seton Catholic's volleyball program, they have stacked the deck and the AIA so far has been powerless to stop them or they are complicit.

Some may argue that it is sour grapes on my part to even raise the issue, and perhaps that has something to do with it. But in reality, it wasn't just my daughter that deserved an equal opportunity to win a state championship, it was also several hundred other athletes that worked their butts off this year competing under the flag of the AIA whose responsiblity it is to provide a level playing field to the kids.

I am not suggesting that the AIA should approach it as perhaps the AYSO does in wanting to make all participants winners. There should be winners and losers in sports just as there are in life, this helps create your character, but placing these kids in a David and Goliath type situation simply is not fair, equitable or honest.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 10:35 pm 
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...however, the purpose of sending our children to school isn't for state championships in volleyball, football or basketball, but for education. If a parent can afford to provide a higher quality education for their child, and in doing so, the school benefits on the athletic field, then so be it.

My way of thinking is, always has been and always will be that there are only 11 players on a football field at a time, 5 on a basketball court, 6 on a volleyball court, etc etc, so even though there may be better players sitting on the bench that realistically may provide a greater opportunity to prevail, if your 11, or 5, or 6 are better then the 11, 5 or 6 that's all that matters because usually those are the teams that win.

Kids in public schools can always practice/train harder in the off-season if they choose to in order to win championships. My personal experience, I went to a public school but we worked our butts off in the offseason and always beat Salpointe. Salpointe always had more quality players, but that doesn't always equate to victories. Are the private school volleyball coaches better than those in public schools? I say that because the notion that better players will always prevail is inaccurate, especially at the high school level. Coaching is probably 60-70% of any sport at the high school level: calling correct plays, organizing offseason workouts, putting the right player in the correct position, etc is even more important.

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